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Ten Things to do in Hong Kong, #4

Ride!!!!

“Ride what?” you ask. Let’s start with one of Hong Kong’s icons, the Star Ferry. For HK$2.30 (US$0.30) or free if you are over 60, you can ride the ferry back and forth across the harbor. As long as you don’t get off, you can make the trip as many times as you wish. You better do it soon, though. At the rate the government is filling in the Harbor, the Star Ferry may soon be a memory.

The Star Ferry
The Star Ferry

For HK$2.00 (US$0.26) or HK$1.00 if you are over 60 or under 12, you can take a 100+ year old Hong Kong Tramways double decker tram all the way from Kennedy Town to Shaukeiwan with destinations in-between or you can grab one headed for Happy Valley. Each tram’s destination is clearly shown on both the front and rear. Do it mid-morning on a week-day. Grab a seat on the upper deck and drink in the atmosphere of bustling Hong Kong. It’s one of my favorite ways to entertain visitors.

Ride the bus from the Central bus terminal beneath Exchange Square to Stanley or the Peak. You can go to Stanley over the top of Hong Kong Island or through the Aberdeen Tunnel. Do both. The former is not unlike a roller coaster ride and if you can grab a front row seat on the upper deck you will be thrilled, I guarantee it. The trip through the tunnel, provides vistas of Hong Kong Islands beautiful Southern shoreline with it’s beaches and craggy headlands. The ride to the peak is not as spectacular as the one to Stanley but it sure beats the Peak Tram and at about half the price.

Take a slow ferry ride to one of the outer islands. The high speed ferrys are fine if you are a commuter but if you want to really get a sense of what an incredible place the Pearl River Delta is, a regular ferry is best. You’ll see a number of off-islands, some inhabited, some not. You’ll also get a sense of how important shipping is to Hong Kong. If you are going to China, try taking a ferry instead of the train. It’s a lot more relaxing and inexpensive and more fun, too.

For even more information on “riding” check out my posting on public transportation in Hong Kong.